Chloe’s Stories

When Chloe Mae wants to read a book (which is pretty much all the time these days) she’s pretty clear about it.  She says, “Bouk, bouk!!”  But when she says , “Stowy, stowy!!” it means she wants to read from this book:

We've read this book so much in the last few months that some of the writing on the front has rubbed off.

There are about 20 stories in this collection, each one about 15 pages long.  Every story starts out the same: “This is Apple Tree Farm.  This is Mrs. Boot, the farmer.  She has two children called Poppy and Sam and a dog called Rusty.”  Quite often, the story just doesn’t quite flow.

The top line says, “Curly is out.”  Then the following lines say, “Then with a grunt, Curly pops through the fence.  ‘He’s out, he’s out,’ shouts Sam.”  They seem to repeat themselves.  I know there are some books that have condensed or more complete versions of the text, so we’ve tried reading through the stories reading on only the top lines or only the bottom lines, but the stories don’t make sense that way either.

If Chloe Mae had it her way, we would read through this 320 page book every day – or even all in one sitting.  DaddyMort and I on the other hand have a limit of about 4 or 5 stories at once.  On the weekends, it leans more towards Chloe’s preferences though – because she has all day to ask for her stories.  And really, what kind of parents would we be if we said, “I’m sorry kiddo.  We’re not going to read any more stories today.”

Let me tell you though, about a half hour before bedtime tonight, DaddyMort and I exchanged a look when Chloe wanted another story.  Who was going to be the lucky parent who got to read with her??  What a problem we have 🙂

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1 Comment

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One response to “Chloe’s Stories

  1. It is a strange problem to have. At one point this weekend, I felt like the world’s worst dad when I actually tried to bribe her with TV instead of reading any more of her stories. I hope that her love of reading carries on throughout her life though. She had a 50-50 chance of being a reader. I’m just glad she seems to be following in her mother’s footsteps and not perpetuating her father’s borderline illiteracy.

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